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Student Advisory Board at Physicians for Human Rights

The PHR National Student Program is managed by PHR’s National Student Advisory Board. Members of the board bring a diverse range of experience and backgrounds to the student program.

 Anna Huh  


Anna Huh is the current chair of PHR’s National Student Advisory Board (SAB). She served as a general board member last year and, prior to that, co-chaired the PHR student chapter at Dartmouth Medical School, which received the 2013 PHR Outstanding Chapter Award. That same year, she also received the PHR Emerging Leader Award. Since starting medical school, she has engaged in community-building in Peru, helped provide educational opportunities for students around impoverished and imprisoned populations in New Hampshire and Vermont, and assisted in the creation of a poverty and street medicine elective for upper-level medical students at Dartmouth. In her fourth year of medical school, Huh is currently taking an academic year to study behavioral health interventions for troubled children as a research fellow with the National Institute of Mental Health Research in Pittsburgh.

 Marie Oliva Hennelly  


Marie Oliva Hennelly is the current vice-chair of the SAB. She has served as regional chapter mentor coordinator and as regional chapter mentor for the New York City and Northeast student chapters over the past two years. Prior to that, Hennelly was a co-leader of the PHR student chapter at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, where she co-founded Mount Sinai's Human Rights and Social Justice Scholars Program – a year-long program for first year medical students. In addition to her human rights work at medical school, she has created educational opportunities for students in areas of integrative medicine, race in medicine and health, and humanism in medicine. She has also conducted research in cancer screening disparities. Hennelly is originally from Santa Fe, NM, and is currently a fourth-year medical student at Mount Sinai in New York.

 Navid Ahmed  


Navid Ahmed is the current Midwest regional chapter mentor for the SAB, a role in which he has served since 2012. Prior to joining the SAB, he was the co-founder/president of the CUNY Sophie Davis chapter, where he helped raise awareness and education on issues such as human trafficking and female genital mutilation as a local and global issue. He also participated in a medical mission trip to Honduras in 2011 with Global Medical Brigades, where alongside physicians, he provided medical care and health care education to the impoverished village of La Chichigua. He is currently a third-year medical student at SUNY Downstate Medical Center.

 Anne-Laure Dassier  


Anne-Laure Dassier is the regional mentor for the Northeastern chapters of the SAB. She was the co-chair of the PHR chapter at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth from 2013 to 2014, during which time she organized a symposium on gender inequity, among other projects. It was not until she left her hometown of Bailly, France that she gained an appreciation for how different healthcare systems can impact access to care – an appreciation that lead her to join Unite for Sight as an undergraduate, to engage in epidemiology projects in Hanoi, Vietnam after her first year of medical school, and ultimately to increase her dedication and service to PHR. She is currently a third-year medical student at Dartmouth.

 Andy Hoang  


Andy Hoang is a second-year medical student at Brown University and currently serves on both the conference and media committees of the SAB. He is the co-founder of the Brown Human Rights Asylum Clinic and served as co-president of the PHR student chapter at Brown last year. Hoang was a Fulbright Fellow and holds an MPH from Columbia University, where he was a John Jay Sharp Scholar. He has a background in NGO organizing with a disciplinary focus in disability rights advocacy in Southeast Asia. His graduate and fellowship research studies have attempted to highlight the underlying sociocultural, economic, and political patterns that animate fear and resentment against the disabled in low-income Southeast Asian countries. He believes strongly in the potential for social change through advocacy, research, praxis, and local partnership. Prior to medical school, Hoang worked for PHR as an intern and consultant.

 Peter Kaminski  


Peter Kaminski serves on the campaigns and advocacy committee of the SAB and is a fourth-year medical student at Alpert Medical School at Brown University. His interest in human rights developed while working as an EMT in southern Boston and as a medical assistant at a free clinic in Amherst, Massachusetts. Through these experiences, he witnessed both urban and rural patients who struggled to have their essential needs met. Kaminski has also been involved in advocacy efforts related to Hepatitis C in Rhode Island, and being the son of political refugees, has been engaged in assisting with refugee health. Upon completion of his medical school training, he intends to enter the field of emergency medicine.

 Nadi Nina Kaonga  


Nadi Nina Kaonga is the New York City regional chapter mentor for the SAB. For the past year, she served as co-chair of the PHR chapter at Tufts University School of Medicine. She helped revitalize the chapter by establishing connections amongst student group leaders and helped with series of events, such as Health and Human Rights Week and World AIDS Month. Kaonga continues to stay engaged in global health initiatives, primarily in Sub-Saharan Africa.

 Ashleigh Long  


Ashleigh Long serves on the campaigns and advocacy committee of the SAB. She received her PhD in genetics from Vanderbilt University prior to attending medical school at the University of Kentucky, where she is currently a fourth-year student. She joined the SAB in 2013, where she oversaw the development of the SAB logo, the annual membership drive, and fundraising efforts. She will be applying to residencies in obstetrics and gynecology this year and plans to continue her advocacy efforts on behalf of women and girls – especially in underserved and impoverished settings. She has previously served as guest blogger and editor for the Carnegie Council’s Global Ethics Network, and was recently acknowledged as one of the American Medical Associations’ Student Advocates of the Year for 2013 and 2014.

 Pranav Reddy  


Pranav Reddy currently serves on the conference committee of the SAB and as co-president of the PHR student chapter at Alpert Medical School at Brown University. Prior to starting medical school, Reddy worked with Calcutta Kids, where he managed a health clinic in an urban informal settlement. During medical school, alongside assisting with asylum cases at Brown's Human Rights Asylum Clinic, he worked for Maternova – a maternal and child health care company working to bring innovations to the frontlines – and conducted research on cost in health care.

 Natalie Ring  


Natalie Ring serves on the conference committee of the SAB and co-chairs the PHR student chapter at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. During her first year of medical school, she created opportunities for students to serve inmate populations in New Hampshire and Vermont, and worked to raise awareness about various other health and human rights issues. Ring is originally from Munich, Germany and is a second-year medical student at Dartmouth.

 Laya Varghese  


Laya Varghese serves on the media committee of the SAB. She is also the founder and leader of the PHR student chapter at the Rowan School of Osteopathic Medicine in New Jersey. Over the last several years, she has been in engaged in street outreach for homeless youth in Boston, in community health advocacy for severely disabled individuals in Peru, and in children's health education in Guatemala. Varghese also volunteers at health clinics for underserved populations in Camden, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. A third-year medical student at Rowan, she credits PHR for encouraging and fostering her continued commitment to health and human rights advocacy.


Afton Chavez is the regional chapter mentor (RCM) coordinator of the SAB. She served as the RCM for the New York City and Northeast chapters last year and, prior to that, co-chaired the PHR student chapter at Dartmouth Medical School – which received the PHR Outstanding Chapter Award. Afton is currently a fourth year medical student at Dartmouth and will be taking an academic scholar year to go to Botswana for research in telemedicine and improvement of medical information resources in rural communities. During medical school, she pioneered a public health awareness campaign for antibiotic-induced ototoxicity in Nicaragua, which won first place at a World Health Organization conference. Through her work with PHR, she has helped facilitate human rights events and mentorship opportunities for fellow students.


Kelly DiLorenzo serves on the conference committee of the SAB. She founded the PHR chapter at Georgetown University School of Medicine in 2012 and served as a chapter co-president. She spent the summer of 2012 providing medical care to patients along the Indo-Tibetan border and currently volunteers at the HOYA clinic, providing free medical care for uninsured patients in Washington, D.C. She is originally from Portland, Oregon, and is currently in her fourth year at Georgetown. She plans to enter the field of emergency medicine.


Himali Gandhi has served as the Southwest regional chapter mentor for the SAB since 2012. She co-founded the PHR chapter at CUNY Sophie Davis Medical School, where she helped spread awareness of human rights violations occurring around the world and what role physicians can play to prevent such atrocities. She also engaged in providing educational opportunities for impoverished people in India during this time. Gandhi is currently a third-year medical student at NYU School of Medicine.


Megan Rose Carr LaPorte is a current co-chair of the PHR student chapter at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and is honored to be serving her first year on the SAB as a member of the media committee. After finishing her undergraduate degree, she was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Grant in Thailand, where she taught English and completed internships at hospitals in Chiang Mai and Umphang. In 2013, she was awarded a Schwartz Compassion Fellowship to study compassion in medical pedagogy and carried out a project to support healthcare for stateless individuals on the Thai-Burma border. A second-year medical student at Dartmouth, she is interested in global health and healthcare optimization in low-resource settings.